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Australian veggie exports jump in 2018

Australian fresh vegetable exports rose by 11.4% last year with Singapore retaining its spot as the leading market, while high growth rates were seen for potatoes, onions, broccoli and cauliflower.

The results were released by industry body Ausveg, whose national manager for export development Michael Coote said progress was testament to the hard work of growers who have persevered with the export process.

“The Australian vegetable industry is continuing to experience solid growth in its exports, particularly on the back of strong performing products such as carrots, potatoes and broccoli/cauliflower to different high-value Asian markets,” Coote said.

With the AUD281 million (US$199.5 million) result, the industry only needs another 12% push over two years to hit its 2020 target of AUD315 million (US$223.7 million).

The growth in volume was faster at 15.5% to reach 227,000 metric tons (MT), of which carrots accounted for almost half.

Singapore was the leading market with Australian fresh vegetable imports worth AUD50 million (US$35.5 million), followed by Japan, Malaysia, Hong Kong and Thailand; the latter notably provided a 54% uptick to AUD7.8 million (US$5.5 million).

The broccoli/cauliflower category was the biggest riser with growth of 24% in value to AUD22.5 million (US$16 million) and volume growth of 33.5% to 8,500MT.

Coote added the positive outcome was also the result of Ausveg and the wider industry providing opportunities for growers to increase their capability and opportunities to enter export markets.

“The Vegetable Industry Export Program, which is delivered by AUSVEG in partnership with Hort Innovation, continues to support the solid growth in fresh vegetable exports,” Coote said.

“In 2018, the program facilitated the development of export capabilities for the industry by bringing 40 buyers into Australia to see local production, taking over 40 growers on outbound trade missions, and up-skilling another 40 growers through export readiness training.

“The continued rise in the value of vegetable exports is particularly impressive when you consider that Australian vegetables are typically lower-priced products that are being grown in a high-cost environment, due to the rising costs of labour, electricity and water.”

Coote noted growers were also subject to the effects of fluctuating exchange rates, but nonetheless exports have continued to build.

“The industry is well on its way to reach the ambitious target of AUD$315 million in fresh vegetable exports by 2020 as outlined by the industry’s export strategy,” he said.

“We are working with growers to ensure they have the skills and knowhow to improve their ability to export their produce and capitalise on increasing demand for fresh, Australian-grown vegetable produce.”

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First Australian broccoli exports hit South Korea

In an Australian first, broccoli direct from the Lockyer Valley has been exported to Seoul in South Korea this week.

South Korea is Asia’s fifth largest economy and imports more than 70% of its food and agricultural products. The Korea-Australia Free Trade Agreement (KAFTA) which started in December 2014, reduces trade and investment barriers and helps level the playing field for Australian exporters competing with those from the USA, Europe, Chile and ASEAN countries, who also benefit from trade deals with Korea.

“This is really exciting for us” said Michael Sippel, Chairman of Lockyer Valley Growers. “Currently only 1% of vegetable imports into South Korea come from Australia and consumer tastes and demand for luxury and high-quality food products are increasing” added Michael.

Until recently, confusion in Australia existed about whether broccoli and other leafy green vegetables had market access into South Korea. Korean authorities recently confirmed access and the first shipment of Australian Broccoli landed in Seoul this week following a direct flight from Brisbane.

“Our vegetable producers in Queensland are gaining an international reputation as producers of high-quality clean, green and safe vegetables. Vegetable producers, especially those based in the Lockyer Valley where a lot of leafy-green vegetables are grown, are excited about the export potential for their produce to South Korea” Michael said.

Other leafy-green vegetables that have export potential in South Korea include lettuce, cauliflower, spinach, kale, Chinese cabbage and brussells sprouts.

Lockyer Valley Growers received funding from Austrade as part of the Free Trade Agreement Training Provider Grant and are implementing the project in conjunction with Bundaberg Fruit and Vegetable Growers, Bowen-Gumlu Growers Association and the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.

A fact sheet on KAFTA and the opportunities for vegetable growers has been developed and can be downloaded at www.lockyervalleygrowers.com.au 

For More information:
Michael Sippel
Lockyer Valley Growers
Tel: +61 0418 479 062Salter
ido@lockyervalleygrowers.com.au

Source: www.freshplaza.com Publication date: 8/25/2017

Australia: Queensland fresh produce on show in Taiwan

Six Queensland producers from Australia’s Murray Darling Basin will be showcasing their produce as part of the ‘Now in Season’ campaign in Taiwan.

In a release, state Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) senior industry development officer Justin Heaven said this was an opportunity for producers to build consumer awareness and demand for Queensland vegetables.

“Producers will be selling their high quality produce through several CitySuper stores in Taiwan over 10 days, culminating with a showcase event on 14 June 2017,” Heaven said.

“This will include a range of in-store promotions, tastings and other networking activities designed to build the presence of Queensland fresh produce.

“The produce that will be showcased includes broccoli, cauliflower, onions, red cabbage, Chinese cabbage, celery, baby leaf products and fresh juice.”

He said growers would also meet with importers, distributors and retail partners to discuss export opportunities.

Heaven said Taiwan had been highlighted as a potential growth market with the total value of fresh produce imported into Taiwan reaching US$295.4 million in 2016, up from US$135.6 million the previous year.

“The Taiwan market does have strict import protocols and regulatory requirements in place, so producers considering trading with Taiwan should investigate the market requirements thoroughly,” he said.

The ‘Now In Season’ campaign is a multi-industry, multi-country integrated promotional program designed to raise awareness of the advantages of quality, safe and healthy Australian horticulture products.

Heaven leads a project that supports irrigators to develop new, high value, export oriented horticulture industries in the Queensland Murray Darling Basin to increase economic activity and employment is areas affected by irrigation water buy-backs under the Murray Darling Basin plan.

www.freshfruitportal.com

Image: Pixabay_b1-photo

‘Now in Season’ heads to Taiwan

Queensland vegetables take centre stage in 10-day promotional programme

Queensland-grown broccoli, cauliflower and onions are among the fresh products being showcased in Taiwan this week as part of the ‘Now in Season’ campaign.

The 10-day promotion is being run through several CitySuper stores, with the centrepiece of the campaign being an exhibition event tomorrow (14 June).

“This will include a range of in-store promotions, tastings and other networking activities designed to build the presence of Queensland fresh produce,” said Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) senior industry development officer, Justin Heaven.

“The produce that will be showcased includes broccoli, cauliflower, onions, red cabbage, Chinese cabbage, celery, baby leaf products and fresh juice. Producers will also to meet with importers, distributers and retail partners to discuss exporting opportunities.”

Taiwan has been highlighted as a potential growth market for Queensland's vegetable trade, with the value of overall fresh produce imports into Taiwan reaching A$295m (US$223m) in 2016, up from A$135,586,000 (US$103m) in 2015. Having said this, Heaven explained it was important for potential exporters to do their due diligence.

“The Taiwan market does have strict import protocols and regulatory requirements in place, so producers considering trading with Taiwan should investigate the market requirements thoroughly,” he said.

The ‘Now In Season’ campaign is a multi-industry promotional programme designed to raise awareness of the advantages of quality, safe and healthy Australian horticulture products.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit Author: Matthew Jones

Image: Pixabay_congerdesign