Vietnam: Dragon fruit to be exported to Australia, Japan

In the near future Vietnam expects to export dragon fruit to both Australia and Japan. Recently, experts from Australia’s Department of Agriculture and Water Resources have been on fact-finding tours of Vietnamese provinces to evaluate their dragon fruit production, packaging and exports. According to experts, once a product is allowed to enter the Australian market, doors would open for it in other markets too.

The visit was one of the final steps before Australia opened its market to fresh dragon fruit from Vietnam, according to the Plant Protection Department.
 
The Australian Government would release a draft report on the evaluation outcomes at the end of this year for stakeholders’ benefit, and possibly allow the import of Vietnamese white and red dragon fruits by the end of this year or early next year, it said.
 
It has also worked with Japanese authorities and Vietnamese fresh dragon fruits could be exported to that country in the near future, it said.
 
Fruit exports to several demanding markets had increases in 2016, it said, with exporters shipping more than 4,608 tonnes to the US, Japan, South Korea, and New Zealand in the first half of the year, a year-on-year increase of 81 per cent.
 
Australia market
 
According to the Vietnam Trade Office in Australia, Australia imports fruits and vegetables worth US$1.7-2 billion from other countries.
 
According to the General Department of Vietnam Customs, total exports to Australia were worth over $1.3 billion this year, with fruits and vegetables accounting for a mere $10.3 million.
 
Explaining why the exports of Vietnamese fruits and vegetables to Australia remain modest, experts pointed to the stringent quarantine system there.
 
Read more at vietnamnews.vn.

Publication date: 7/22/2016

 

Australian vegetable export data shows strong growth

Australian vegetable exports rose by more than 15 percent last year, mainly due to strong international demand. Back home though, retailers and consumers are reporting higher prices than normal for vegetables at the store level.

The export figures, recently released by Ausveg, show fresh vegetable exports grew to $281 million in 2018 on the back of healthy growth in key export markets in Singapore (7.5% value growth), Japan (8.7% value growth) and Thailand (54% value growth).

The total volume of Australian fresh vegetable exports increased 15.5% to 227,000 tons, with increases across most major markets, again including Singapore, Japan and Thailand.

Carrots remained the strongest export performer in 2018 at 113,000 tons, increasing in value by 5.1% to $98m. Some other key vegetable exports included potatoes, onions, celery, broccoli and cauliflower, which all increased in value and volume in 2018.

Ausveg national manager - export development, Michael Coote, said the organisation's Vegetable Industry Export Program, in partnership with Hort Innovation, continues to support the solid growth in fresh vegetable exports.

Coote said the vegetable industry was well on its way to reaching the target of $315m in fresh vegetable exports by 2020 as outlined by the industry's export strategy.

Source: queenslandcountrylife.com.au via www.freshplaza.com 

Slowdown, what slowdown?

China's 2018 fresh fruit imports are up 36 per cent over the prior year, despite the country's slowing economic growth
China’s 2018 fresh fruit import figures reflect no signs of the country’s reported economic slowdown, recording a 36 per cent rise in value over the prior year.

According to Fresh Intelligence analysis of the latest China Customs figures, China imported a total of 4.8m tonnes of fresh fruit in 2018, worth US$6.9bn. This is up from the 3.8m tonnes valued at US$5.1bn imported in 2017, and achieved during a year when China recorded its slowest economic growth since 1990.

Imports from Chile, Thailand and the Philippines showed the greatest growth in 2018: up 68 per cent, 67 per cent and 42 per cent respectively in value terms over the previous year, the data showed.

Chile was just ahead of Thailand as the largest supplier by value due to the high prices of its cherries and grapes, Fresh Intelligence’s Wayne Prowse explained. In volume terms Chile ranked fourth after Vietnam (1.23m tonnes), the Philippines (1.16m tonnes) and Thailand (767, 472 tonnes) with 387,728 tonnes in 2018.

Meanwhile, Thai imports increased 67 per cent in value over 2017, and were dominated by durians and mangosteens.

The Philippines ranked third in import value growth terms, with mostly bananas and pineapples, and was followed by Vietnam, with dragonfruit and longans.

New Zealand imports, mostly kiwifruit and apples, saw a 21 per cent growth in value during 2018, while Australia was just behind, dominated by grapes and citrus and showing growth of 19 per cent.

The US slipped to seventh from fifth position in China’s 2018 import value rankings, and was the only major trading partner to lose value by 31 per cent, the figures showed.

The US export decline to China reflects the impact of retaliatory tariffs and stricter customs controls on US imports due to the diplomatic tensions between the two countries, which began in July 2018.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Luisa Cheshire

China cherry potential

China offers great export opportunities to Argentine and Australian cherry growers, says Fruta Cloud
China will become a top cherry market for newcomers Argentina and Australia, despite tariff and fumigation challenges, as cherry demand throughout the country grows, predicts Fruta Cloud.

The Shanghai-based B2B imported fruit service provider said mainland Australia, which gained cherry access last year, has a geographical and transport-cost advantage over top cherry supplier Chile. Meanwhile, Argentina, which also gained cherry access last year, can express-ship its cherries by sea three times a week.

Indeed, Fruta Cloud said it was the first company to introduce Argentine cherries to the market this season by supplying Alibaba Group’s Hema supermarkets.

Fruta Cloud said the export opportunities for Australia and Argentina cherries in China out-weigh the challenges, which for Australia include preserving fruit quality after compulsory fumigation, and for Argentina involve a 10 per cent import tariff and a cold-treatment protocol.

“As the demand for cherries is growing stronger, it is believed that China will become one of the most important exporting markets for Argentinian and Australian cherries. Lucky Chinese consumers are provided with more options for cherries,” Fruta Cloud said in a press release.

Chile is currently China’s top Southern Hemisphere cherry supplier, shipping over 15,000 tonnes of cherries via ocean and sea from late October to the end of February, Fruta Cloud said.

“Chilean cherries have been performing well in recent years owing to their outstanding quality, such as large size and good firmness,” the company said in statement. “Thus Chilean cherries win a good reputation among consumers. In addition, the huge marketing investment from [Chilean exporter association] Asoex in China has also played a significant role in this item’s success.”

After years targetting China’s first-tier cities, Chilean cherry exporters are now focusing on the second and third-tier cities, which have great consumption potential, Fruta Cloud added.

Fruta Cloud said it helped Asoex launch Chilean cherries at Shuangfu Wholesale Market in Chongqing in January this year. “This event successfully ignited the passion for Chilean cherries in Midwest China,” Fruta Cloud said.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit

Author: Luisa Cheshire 

New Zealand - Spotlight on quality avocado to Australia

Jen Scoular:

Normally there is a collective sigh of relief as NZ finishes an avocado export season but this year it's a different story. They experienced significant quality issues post-November, especially for their avocados going into the Australian market.

NZ harvests avocados five months of the year for export markets, and aim to harvest just in time to be cooled and packed, loaded on to the appropriate vessel, arrive in Australia to be cleared, trucked to the distribution centre or wholesale market and be available to customer orders.

Avocados are unlike kiwifruit and apples where they are all harvested at once, then coolstored until the market is ready. The tree is the coolstore, and post-harvest needs to be as speedy as possible.

Another challenge is that the New Zealand growing season is cooler and wetter than growing seasons in Western Australia, Chile, Peru and Mexico — who are NZ competitors.

 Source: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=12210443 

Australia scores improved citrus, carrot access to Indonesia with signed FTA

Australia’s National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) has welcomed the recently signed free trade agreement with Indonesia, which will give improved market access for a range of agricultural products including carrots and citrus.

It said “wide-ranging wins” for farmers were at the heart of the much much-anticipated Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA), signed in Indonesia on March 4.

“Today represents real tangible benefits to the hip pocket of many Australian farmers,” said National Farmers’ Federation CEO Tony Maharsaid. “IA-CEPA will deliver improved market access for live cattle, feed grains, beef, sheepmeat, dairy, sugar, fruit, carrots, potatoes and honey.”

The tariff relief represents an extra AUD$5-10 million to Australia’s fresh vegetable exports per annum, Mahar said.

Carrots, Australia’s largest vegetable export, are at the forefront of the agreement with tariffs to be cut to 10% (down from 25%) for 5000 metric tons (MT) per year, increasing to 10,000MT after 10 years, and tariffs eliminated after 15 years.

There will also be improved access for key Australian citrus exports.

For mandarins, the tariff will be cut immediately to 10% (from 25%) for 7,500MT per year and reduced over time down to 0% after 20 years for an unlimited volume.

For oranges, there will be duty-free access for 10,000MT, increasing 5% each year, while for lemons and limes here will be duty-free access for 5,000MT, increasing 2.5% each year

Tariffs on potatoes will be cut immediately to 10% (from 25%) for 10,000MT per year, and after five years tariff further reduced to 5% for 12,500MT per year.

Source: https://www.freshfruitportal.com 

Australia, Indonesia sign FTA

Scheduled signing of trade agreement expected to end months-long period of uncertainty for exporters

Australian trade minister, Simon Birmingham met with Enggartiasto Lukita, trade minister for Indonesia and signed a highly anticipated free trade agreement (FTA).

The deal was planned to be signed before the end of 2018, however, tensions surrounding the location of Australia’s embassy in Israel rattled the leaders’ relationship.

Thankfully, today the agreement was signed opening up opportunity to Australian horticulture.

“Our farmers will export more produce because of this deal,” Australian minister for agriculture, David Littleproud said. “Preferential deals will be put in place or duty will be removed for more than 99 per cent of exports to Indonesia,” he added.

Citrus and vegetables are reportedly sectors that will benefit, and Ausveg national manager, Michael Coote told ABC News the agreement could have Australia’s major carrot and potato growers back on Indonesia’s supermarket shelves “almost immediately”.

“Indonesia is a major trading partner close to our shores, so there are benefits in terms of reduced freight times.

“Having access back into this market that is so close, has such a large population and does have an appetite for Australian produce is a real boom for the vegetable industry,” he said.

Littleproud said improved duty-free quotas will be in place for citrus and other horticultural products.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit 

Author: Camellia Aebischer 

Agriculture a winner of Indonesia trade deal

The Hon David Littleproud MP
Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources


Monday 4 March 2019

• Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement signed today
• Increases livestock, beef and sheep meat, grains, sugar, dairy and citrus exports
• Builds on the long-standing trading relationship Australia shares with Indonesia

Australian farmers are big winners in the Indonesia-Australia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IA-CEPA) which was signed today.

Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources David Littleproud said once in force the deal would help farmers sell more product.

“Our farmers will export more produce because of this deal,” Minister Littleproud said.

“We’re giving our farmers more options and creating competition for Australian produce.

“Beef and sheep farmers are big winners – tariffs will disappear and more cattle will be exported.

“All tariffs on beef and sheep meat will be eliminated over five years with most eliminated immediately. At the moment they sit at 5 per cent.

“The first 575,000 head of live male cattle are now duty free, growing to 700,000 over six years.

“Sugar tariffs will be slashed from a maximum 12 per cent to 5 per cent.

“The first 500,000 tonnes of grain per year will also be duty free and that will grow by 5 per cent a year.

“Improved duty free quotas will also be put in place for citrus and horticultural products.

“Also we’re increasing work and holiday visas for Indonesians from 1000 to 5000 which makes a big difference for producers who need seasonal workers.

“Preferential deals will be put in place or duty will be removed for more than 99 per cent of exports to Indonesia.

“Since coming to government, the Coalition has delivered six major free trade agreements.

“These are key to realising our ambition of a $100 billion agricultural industry by 2030.

“It will help boost farm gate prices, driving regional growth and jobs.”

Source: http://minister.agriculture.gov.au/littleproud/Pages/Media-Releases/Agriculture-a-winner-of-Indonesia-trade-deal.aspx 

 

Australia to boost Vietnam trade ties through table grapes

Việt Nam is a potential market for Australian table grapes because of its growing middle class, rapid economic growth and the increasing purchasing power of Vietnamese consumers.

The statement was made by Yvonne Chan, Australian Deputy Consul-General and Senior Trade Commissioner to Việt Nam, at a seminar in Hà Nội on Thursday.

The event was organised to cement existing trade relations and build new partnerships among Australian table grape exporters and Vietnamese importers.

Table grapes are produced in all Australian states, with the majority grown in Victoria. Of the country’s roughly 1,000 table grape growers, most are small-scale, family owned businesses.

Australia plants an average volume of 170,000 tonnes of table grapes each year, 62 per cent of which is exported to 42 countries and territories, Chan said.

Việt Nam is the 7th largest importer of Australian table grapes with a 4 per cent share, following China (38 per cent), Indonesia (15 per cent), Japan (10 per cent), Hong Kong (7 per cent), the Philippines (5 per cent) and Thailand (5 per cent).

According to Dianne Phan, trade head of Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited, Việt Nam is a key export market for Australia, and the Australian table grape industry has worked hard to introduce Vietnamese consumers of Australian grapes.

“Over the past four years, Australian table grape exports have grown 73 per cent, demonstrating the increasing demand for our high quality and premium produce,” she said.

Australian Table Grapes Association CEO Jeff Scott said several new varieties were coming into production for export this year such as sweet nectar, sweet sapphire, pristine seedless, long crimson, cotton candy and melody seedless. However, thompson seedless and crimson seedless are still expected to be Australia’s main export varieties.

“Việt Nam is one of the best favourable markets for Australian table grapes, especially thanks to the easy delivery through air flights between the two countries,” Scott told Việt Nam News.

“I expect the exporting volume of Australian table grapes into Việt Nam will reach 7,000 tonnes this year, nearly five times higher than that in 2016,” Scott said.

Besides table grapes, Australia is exporting two other types of fruits into Việt Nam, including citrus and cherry fruits.

Negotiations are also ongoing to bring Australian stone fruits into the Vietnamese market.

“I look forward to the trade ties between Australia and Việt Nam being closer and more and more Australian products being presented in Việt Nam, especially after Việt Nam officially became a member of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP),” Chan told Việt Nam News. — VNS


Source: https://vietnamnews.vn

 

 

Halos™ seedless easy peel mandarins available in Australia

Halos™ Mandarins are grown in sunny California by Wonderful® Citrus and available in Australia for a limited time thanks to Turners International Marketing Ltd who manages the programme for the Australia and New Zealand markets.

Mano A. Babiolakis from Turners International Marketing Ltd is excited to launch Halos™ Mandarins a well recognised brand here in Australia. Halos™ Mandarins is one of the leading citrus brands in the USA and for a limited time only will be available here in Australia through specialist greengrocers in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney including Harris Farms, Drakes Supermarkets QLD and Market Place Fresh Melbourne.

We are pleased to be working with Nutrano Produce Group on the distribution of Halos™ Mandarins through their wholesale stands at the produce markets in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne with demonstrations taking place during key trading period.

Nutrano Produce Group CEO, George Haggar comments “The launch of Halos™ Mandarins at the Nutrano Produce Group stand in the Sydney market this week went well and we are looking forward to launching at our Nutrano Produce Group stands in Brisbane and Melbourne markets next week.”

Halos™ Mandarins are grown in sunny California and are a perfect health snack, loved by both kids and grown-ups alike. Halos™ Mandarins are SWEET – sweetened by Mother Nature on the branch making them a great alternative to lollies and soft drinks. They are also SEEDLESS and have a soft thin skin which makes them EASY PEEL for kids and easy for everyone to enjoy.

Halos™ Mandarins are available in 750g prepacks or 9kg loose carton in specialist greengrocers. Look out for the special Halos™ fruit stickers.

For more information:
Mano Babiolakis
Turners International Marketing
Email: mano@globalproduce.com.au
Mobile: +61413 482 158


Publication date : 2/28/2019

Source: www.freshplaza.com 

Australia and Vietnam strengthen trade ties through table grapes

As the Australian table grape export season commences, Australian growers head to Vietnam to boost trade relations.

Three key growers from the Sunraysia region, which is responsible for around 99 per cent of table grape exports, representation from the Australian Table Grapes Association and a delegation from Austrade, will be on the ground in both Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City from February 28 to March 1 to promote the premium product.

Hosted under the Hort Innovation Taste Australia banner, the upcoming trade marketing activity aims to cement existing trade relations and develop new and exciting partnerships.

Hort Innovation acting trade lead Dianne Phan said Vietnam was currently the 7th largest importer of Australian table grapes.

“Vietnam is a key exporting country for Australia, and the Australian table grape industry has worked hard to educate and promote Australian grapes to Vietnamese consumers,” she said.

“Over the past four years, Australian table grape exports have grown 73 per cent, demonstrating the increasing demand for our high quality and premium produce.

“Moving forward, we expect that we will be able to produce more of the grapes that Vietnamese consumers love.”

Australian Table Grapes Association CEO Jeff Scott said several new varieties were coming into production for export this year such as; Sweet Nectar, Sweet Sapphire, Pristine Seedless, Long Crimson, Cotton Candy and Melody Seedless to name a few.

“Many growers have planted new varieties in large numbers under commercial licences and have commenced exporting,” he said.

“If any variety proves successful or demand is high from importing countries, additional plantings will take place to satisfy demand.”

Mr Scott said Thompson Seedless and Crimson Seedless were still expected to be Australia's main export varieties.

“As an industry, we are seeing year on year growth in table grape exports and this is a very pleasing outcome for growers.”

Mr Scott will present an industry update during the trade activities in Vietnam providing key partners with a seasonal overview of the 2019 crop forecast and the 5 to 10-year crop yield predictions.

He will also provide more information about the systems Australian industry have in place to continually maintain Australia’s clean, green and safe reputation.

For more information:
Farah Abdurahman
Tel: +61 447 304 255
Email: Farah.Abdurahman@horticulture.com.au


Publication date : 2/27/2019

Source: www.freshplaza.com  

 

Philippine bananas eyeing Australia

Asian nation hopes to gain access soon and diversify exports as global competition with South America tightens.

Once the primary concern of black sigatoka disease is addressed, Manila is hopeful it will gain access to Australia for Philippine bananas.

In a bid to diversify its export portfolio amid growing pressure from South American banana suppliers, the country is exploring new markets for its major export commodity.

Later this month, the Bureau of the Plant Industry and the Philippine Banana Growers and Exporters Association (BPGEA) will submit technical documents to Canberra covering comprehensive Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) measures.

Stephen Antig, president of the BPGEA said Australia is likely to be a small market, considering it has banana plantations and its own banana export programmes. However, he noted that Philippine bananas can maintain a competitive advantage in price point as they are cheaper than locally-grown Australian bananas.

Business Mirror reported that in late November, the Philippines and Australia held a round of agricultural talks in Canberra focusing on SPS concerns. In that meeting, a six-month timeframe was set for Australia to evaluate documents and decide on if it would pass Manila’s SPS and quarantine standards.

Agriculture undersecretary Ariel Cayanan said the Philippines is optimistic it would overcome SPS concerns set by Australia.

He said the industry has a very early response to sigatoka, destroying a plant upon detection at its roots, before the disease can spread further. “If we see something wrong with the roots, we address it immediately and the plant will not grow anymore.”

According to a report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, in 2018 the Philippines regained its place as the second-largest global supplier of bananas, with Ecuador in the lead.

Source: http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit Author: Camellia Aebischer